The terrifying arsenal at Iran’s disposal: Islamic Republic could disable Israel with EMPs and may have stockpile of dirty bombs, experts warn after Tehran bragged it will unleash ‘weapons never used before’ if attacked


Experts have warned that Iran may have an unknown arsenal of electromagnetic pulses and dirty bombs after Tehran threatened it would strike Israel with “weapons it has never used before.”

Iran made its threat in an attempt to deter Israeli retaliation following an unprecedented barrage of missiles and drones by the Islamic Republic.

Professor Gerald Steinberg, head of the Jerusalem-based NGO Watchdog, said: “If such ‘never-before-seen’ weapons exist, they will likely have larger and more advanced payloads and warheads compared to the missiles and drones it has launched against Israel.”

Islamic Republic President Ebrahim Raisi warned that the “smallest invasion” by Israel would lead to a “huge and cruel” response.

Here, experts assess the potential arsenal at Iran’s disposal and the potential devastation these weapons could cause.

Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi (pictured) warned during an annual military parade that the “smallest invasion” by Israel would trigger a “huge and harsh” response, as the region braces for possible Israeli retaliation.

A missile was launched during a military exercise in an unknown location in southern Iran

A missile was launched during a military maneuver in an unknown location in southern Iran

Electromagnetic pulse weapons (EMPs)

Electromagnetic pulse (EMPs) weapons use light, lasers, invisible microwaves and electromagnetic energy to cut off electricity – and experts claim Iran has EMPs in its arsenal.

The US military warned in 2018 that Iran was developing such weapons and the deadly consequences they could have if used, estimating that an EMP attack on US soil could kill millions in the sheer chaos it would create.

The goal of using EMP is to destroy enemy command, control, communications, computing, surveillance, and intelligence capabilities without harming people or infrastructure.

Military and commercial aircraft would deteriorate, bases would be cut off, and power and GPS would be cut off, making defense and counterattacks nearly impossible.

Asaf Romirovsky, Ph.D Middle East and Mediterranean Studies from King’s College London said electromagnetic pulses are one of Israel’s “major” concerns, because they would “render the country defenseless.”

“The domino effect of an EMP attack is that the Iranian axis groups — Hamas, Hezbollah and the Houthis — will then start shooting at Israel if it is unable to respond,” said the expert, who now heads Scholars for Middle East Peace. .

Romirovsky added: “The greatest threat has always been the use of weapons of mass destruction, as the region fully understands the threat posed by Iran as the largest destabilizing force in the region.”

Electromagnetic pulse (EMPs) weapons use light, lasers, invisible microwaves and electromagnetic energy to cut electricity - and experts claim Iran has EMPs in its arsenal (archive image)

Electromagnetic pulse (EMPs) weapons use light, lasers, invisible microwaves and electromagnetic energy to cut electricity – and experts claim Iran has EMPs in its arsenal (archive image)

Iranians drive past a huge anti-Israel billboard bearing images of Iranian missiles and the phrase written in Persian: “Israel is weaker than a spider’s web,” in Tehran, April 16, 2024.

Iranians drive past a huge anti-Israel billboard bearing images of Iranian missiles and the phrase written in Persian: “Israel is weaker than a spider’s web,” in Tehran, April 16, 2024.

A printed image provided by the Iranian Army Media Office on January 19, 2024 shows a missile being launched during a military exercise at an undisclosed location in southern Iran.

A printed image provided by the Iranian Army Media Office on January 19, 2024 shows a missile being launched during a military exercise at an undisclosed location in southern Iran.

chemical weapons

Another expert also claimed that among the weapons never before seen in Iran’s arsenal are chemical weapons, which are considered lethal weapons of mass destruction.

He added: “It is possible that the Islamic Republic has a stockpile of chemical weapons. They were victims of such weapons in the 1990s when Iraq used them in its war against Iran, so they know how lethal they are, says Professor John Strawson, lecturer in Middle Eastern studies at the University of East London.

Several Western governments have accused Iran of developing and maintaining its chemical weapons arsenal in the past, something Iran has consistently denied.

Professor Strawson said that “their use would be very high risk”, because the release of chemical weapons would trigger a devastating response by Israel and its allies and would “further weaken them politically in the region”.

But he believes that after the Iranian blitz last weekend, anything is possible.

“We have entered an unpredictable period in the Middle East,” the Middle East expert said after the failed Iranian missile attack “damaged their reputation with their proxies” after shooting down more than 99 percent.

nuclear weapons

Iran’s threats to use “weapons we’ve never used before” raise fears that drone and missile attacks could prompt Tehran to develop nuclear weapons.

The Islamic Republic has several nuclear research sites, two uranium mines, a research reactor, and uranium processing facilities – including three uranium enrichment plants.

A United Nations report in 2007 concluded that Iran halted its alleged nuclear weapons program in 2003, and an International Atomic Energy Agency report in 2018 said it found no evidence of nuclear weapons activity after 2009.

In 2015, Iran signed the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action – or Iran nuclear deal – along with countries including the US, UK, France, Russia and China, and imposed restrictions on Iran’s nuclear facilities.

An Iranian military truck carries missiles during a military parade as part of a celebration marking the country's annual Army Day in the capital, Tehran, on April 17, 2024.

An Iranian military truck carries missiles during a military parade as part of a celebration marking the country’s annual Army Day in the capital, Tehran, on April 17, 2024.

A drone is launched during a military exercise at an undisclosed location in Iran, in this handout photo obtained on August 25, 2022.

A drone is launched during a military exercise at an undisclosed location in Iran, in this handout photo obtained on August 25, 2022.

Iranian missiles are displayed in a park on January 20, 2024 in Tehran

Iranian missiles are displayed in a park on January 20, 2024 in Tehran

Iranian medium-range missiles are on display

Iranian medium-range missiles “Naziat” are displayed during the annual Army Day celebration at a military base in Tehran, Iran, April 17, 2024.

However, the agreement suffered a major blow in 2018 when the United States – under President Donald Trump – withdrew and imposed new sanctions on Iran under a “maximum pressure” policy, essentially cutting Iran off from the international financial system.

In November 2023, an International Atomic Energy Agency report estimated that Iran’s uranium stockpile was 22 times greater than the limit agreed upon in the 2015 Iran nuclear deal.

In December, the International Atomic Energy Agency warned that Iran had increased its uranium enrichment rate to 60 percent purity, near weapons-grade levels, and had enough enriched uranium to make three atomic bombs.

“Iran may accelerate its nuclear weapons program which Iran could use to develop a nuclear bomb to deter any attacks by Israel against Tehran and Iran,” said Adham Mardini, a former Syrian diplomat and current lecturer at the University of Central Lancashire. Its proxy groups.



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